Innovation Management:

Discovery

Experimentation

Innovation Process and the Key To Discovery

Vadim Kotelnikov personal logo Vadim Kotelnikov

Founder, Ten3 Business e-Coach Inspiration and Innovation unlimited!

"Don’t be afraid of the trial-and-error approach." Estee Lauder

"No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." Albert Einstein

"The stream of truth flows through its channels of mistakes." Rabindranath Tagore

The Tao of Experimentation

"The more regulations there are, the poorer the people." Lao Tzu

  1. YIN (passive, accepting side). Outside-In: learning to make better predictions and learning from experiments.

  2. YANG (active, aggressive side). Inside-Out: developing a hypothesis, trying something new and unproven.

The Jazz of Innovation Creative Chaos Creative Chaos Creative Chaos Innovation System Innovation System Continuous Innovation Radical Innovation Vadim Kotelnikov Rapid Experimentation Entrepreneurial Creativity Feedback Is Your Elevator To Success Asking Searching Questions Learning SWOT Questions Vadim Kotelnikov Ten3 Business e-Coach Experimentation EXPERIMENTATION: The Virtuous Circle of Experimentation

Learning SWOT Questions

  • What went unexpectedly well and why?

  • Are there any new directions to be explored?... More

 

Inspirational and Empowering Leadership Roles

Developing The Fast-Paced Flexible Culture

By: Michael Dell

 

 

Experimentation Defined

Experimentation means trying something new and unproven – and acknowledging that you cannot reliably predict the outcome.

Experimentation: The Key to Discovery

Discovering what works requires that you understand the casual links between inputs and outputs. When it comes to searching for cause-effect relationships, perhaps the most suitable model that emerges is the method of experimentation that allows the most efficient scientific progress, the scientific method as a model for discovery.1

The process could begin with a brainstorming sessions, listing potential experimental activities.

The JAZZ of INNOVATION (Ten3 Mini-course) - innovation management, innovation process, guiding structure creative chaos, improvisatio

Balanced Organization: 5 Basic Elements

Metal (Empowered Employees):

"Ready-Fire-Aim" is Better Than "Ready-Aim-Fire"

Tom Peters talks about going for “ready, fire, aim” as a better approach than “ready, aim, fire.” Don't  take too long procrastinating rather than just getting on with it and treating failures as learning opportunities. Without action, you cannot know whether or not what you are thinking about will actually work.

Sounding smart should not substitute for doing something smart. Actions count more than elegant concepts and plans. Create an inspiring corporate culture of “fire” rather than “aim” to send out strong messages about the value of action rather than talk and instill confidence in your people.5

 Case in Point  Silicon Valley Firms

In the Silicon Valley, strategic alignment – the process of linking innovation strategy with corporate vision, goals, objectives, and strategy – results as much from tacit understandings as explicit ones. "And Valley leaders know that you'll never achieve perfect alignment without squelching creativity and experimentation. Organizational norms and entrepreneurial experience continuously reinforce the opportunism from which new discoveries and alignment can spring."1

 Case in Point  Dell Inc.

"To encourage people to innovate more, you have to make it safe for them to fail," writes  Michael Dell8, the Founder of Dell Inc. "If a team experiments with something and says "These are the facts. This doesn't work and here's why," that's not failure. That's a learning experience and, typically, an important milestone on the road to achieving success."

"Our business is by definition full of innovation and experimentation because so many things that we try haven't ever been done before. We're facing new challenges and can't look to history because it's not relevant... We're often faced with problems that we know represent an opportunity and it's up to us to create an entire business out of it. That's the fun staff. But we also know that if we don't do it, someone else will. We're forced to innovate to stay ahead of the competition. And when you're dealing in an industry that's changing so dynamically, there are often more unknowns than knowns."

"You also need to embrace an experimental attitude in making decisions. Sometime you can't wait for all the data to present themselves before making a decision. You have to make the best decision you possibly can based on your experience, intuition, available data, and assessment of risk. There's a guaranteed element of risk in any business, so experiment – but experiment wisely."

Customer-driven Innovation: 7 Practice Tips

Involve everyone, require every person, regardless of their position, to spend time on customer contact and services activities. Ask all your employee to get on board with customer-driven innovation and value innovation. Encourage experimentation and risk taking... More

 

 Discover much more in the

FULL VERSION of e-Coach

Developing Tolerance for Mistakes...

The Scientific Method as a Model for Discovery...

Evaluation of Hypothesis: Typical Learning Mistakes...

Pursuing Business Opportunities: Rapid Experimentation...

Experimental Approach to Venture Management...

Testing an Experimental Business Model...

Creating and Leading an Adaptive Organization...

Managing Creativity in Your Business Environment...

Creative Chaos Environment...

Idea Management...

Cross-pollination of Ideas...

Letting the Best Ideas Win...

Mutual Creativity in Business Partnerships...

 Case in Point  Discovery Center of Corning: Culture of Innovation...

 Case in Point  Procter & Gamble...

 Case in Point  IDEO...

 

 

 

 

 

References::

  1. "Strategic Management", Third Edition, Alex Miller

  2. "Sometimes a Great Notion", James C. Collins, Inc.

  3. "Experimentation Is Easy, Learning Is Not," Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble

  4. "Strategy, Execution, Innovation," Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble

  5. "The Knowing-Doing Gap," Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert Sutton

  6. Relentless Growth, Christopher Meyer

  7. "Don't Shout, Listen," Fara Warner

  8. Direct from Dell, Michael Dell with Catherine Fredman

  9. Creative Achiever, Vadim Kotelnikov

  10. The Jazz of Innovation, Vadim Kotelnikov

The Jazz of Innovation

Creativity Management

Creative Chaos Environment

Opportunity-driven Business Development

Pursuing Business Opportunities: Rapid Experimentation

Feedback Is Your Elevator To Success

Effective Organization

Innovation-friendly Organization

Inspiring Culture

The JAZZ of INNOVATION (Ten3 Mini-course)