Opportunity-driven Business Development:

Fast Company

Sustaining Speed

Living Speed Being Constantly First to Market

By: Vadim Kotelnikov

Founder, Ten3 Business e-Coach Inspiration and Innovation Unlimited!

 

   

"Speed is everything. It is the indispensable ingredient in competitiveness."

~ Jack Welch 

 

Moving with Speed Fast Thinking Fast Decision Making Fast to Market Sustaining Speed Anticipating Spotting Trends Brainstorming Letting the Best Idea Win Setting Rules and Guiding Principles Getting Rid of Bureaucracy Constantly Reassessing Past Decisions Launching a Crusade Owning Competitive Advantage Innovation System Simplicity Growth Attitude Managing Creativity Roadmapping Customer Intimacy Boundarylessness Self-confidence Ten3 Business e-Coach: why, what, and how 1000ventures.com Business Process Management System (BPMS) Staying Beneath the Radar Switching Responsibilities Fast Company: Fast Thinking, Fast Decision-making, Fast to market, Sustaining Speed

Sustaining Speed

Main Strategies

 

Blue Ocean vs. Red Ocean Strategy

Sustainable Competitive Advantage

Winning Not Once, But Constantly

Though almost all companies are able to point with pride to a market victory they achieved in the past. "But a few companies are constantly fast and first to market, viewed by everyone as innovative, scoring one big win after another, and achieving huge growth year after year."1

 

The Power of Simplicity

"The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak." ~ Hans Hofmann

Getting simple in business helps people work smarter and navigate infinite choices. By simplifying complex procedures and establishing simple idea evaluation and decision making techniques, you are making it easier for people make decisions faster and implement these decisions with speed.

 Case in Point  Lessons from Jack Welch

Jack Welch's prescription  for winning in business is:

"If you're not fast you can't win... Speed is everything. It is the indispensable ingredient of competitiveness," says Welch, former legendary CEO of GE. Speed, simplicity and self-confidence are closely intertwined. By simplifying the organization and instilling confidence, you create the foundation for an organization that incorporates speed into the fabric of the company.... More

 Case in Point  Google

'Fast is better than slow,' says one of the Google's 10 Guiding Principles.

Google launches early and often in small beta tests before releasing new features widely.

"There are two different types of programmers. Some like to code for months or even years, and hope they will have built the perfect product... The problem is, if you get it wrong, you get a thud, a thud in which you've spent, like, five years and 100 people on something the market doesn't want. Others prefer to have something working at the end of the day, something to refine and improve the next day. That's what we do: our 'launch early and often' strategy. The hardest part about indoctrinating people into our culture is when engineers show me a prototype and I'm like, 'Great, let's go!' They'll say, 'Oh, no, it's not ready. It's not up to Google standards. This doesn't look like a Google product yet.' They want to castle-build and do all these other features and make it all perfect. I tell them, 'The Googly thing is to launch it early on Google Labs and then iterate, learning what the market wants and making it great.' The beauty of experimenting in this way is that you never get too far from what the market wants. The market pulls you back," says Marissa Mayer... More